3500 Travels

Klamath Falls

We traveled to Klamath Falls mainly to visit an old high school friend of mine, Jim Bryant. Five years ago we visited him in Ft Klamath, but he moves around. It was good to see him and chat about various things – much more than high school reminiscences. Jim has a remarkable memory as far as I am concerned. I learned about his ancestry in rather remarkable detail. Apparently some of his American ancestors go back to the late 1600s.

Cathie and Jim Bryant

Cathie and Jim Bryant

I also wanted to get the oil changed in the truck and he helped find a reasonably priced place. Turned out the rear differential oil needed changing too. Let’s just say a good deal of time was spent in, or waiting for, Lithia Toyota service. But I’m glad it is done and it gave us a lot of time to walk and do laundry. Oh, Jim also played guide at Walmart, which he knows well. One of the things I wanted was sweats. The sleeping bag I brought along is turning out to be pretty marginal. The night was pretty cold, not freezing but close. The sweats made a big difference. Life on the road is tough!
We stayed at the Klamath Falls KOA, which is small compared to the one in Boomtown. Still, it had a shower which is always welcome. (written 9/5/15)

Klamath Falls KOA

Klamath Falls KOA


Pup Tent for a cold night.

Pup Tent for a cold night.

After meeting Jim one last time, where he generously gave me a knit cap to keep my head warm at night, we headed out of Klamath Falls about 3:30 in the afternoon on Saturday, September 5th. We didn’t plan to go far on our way to La Grande where Andy and Sarah Steele live. We headed up US 97 and turned east onto Silver Lake Road. We stopped at the info station for the Klamath Wildlife Refuge. It is way out of the way with almost no traffic.

Silver Lake Road

Silver Lake Road


Wildlife Refuge

Wildlife Refuge


Hand stitched panorama of wildlife refuge.

Hand stitched panorama of wildlife refuge.

We then turned onto a forest service road 7640 somewhere around mile 14. We drove back about 2 miles and finally found a wide enough spot in the road to turn around, park, and have the truck on level ground. This is home for tonight (#30). Rather unexpectedly, another truck came by with a man and a woman. She nodded her head as they passed. It turned out there was a more “established” camping spot a few hundred yards farther up the road. Perhaps because we were at the first wide spot in the road it attracts those looking for a place to stop and drink beer. We picked up about a dozen cans that had been there quite a while. Bud Light not too surprisingly. However, I always like to leave the places I camp cleaner than when I came, so the cans provided an opportunity to do just that.

Boondock campsite

Boondock campsite

After dinner we walked into the woods a ways. For the dogs it must be a riot of smells. They go this way then that, always pulling on their leashes. We saw tree stumps indicating that they were about 80 years old when felled. Hard to tell how long ago that was, but a few decades I would think given the size of the bigger trees there now.

Forest lichen

Forest lichen


Alpenglow on tree tops

Alpenglow on tree tops

It was very quiet. While we saw deer droppings and evidence of where they had bedded down, there were few birds and only a couple of chipmunks. When we left in the morning we saw one deer by the side of Silver Lake Road.

We had coffee but nothing else for breakfast, so we stopped in Christmas Valley at The Pines Café. Quite the country place. We left the two young dogs tied up outside where they took up the role of greeters.

The Pines Cafe

The Pines Cafe


Inside The Pines Cafe

Inside The Pines Cafe