3500 Travels

Last Days in Maine

Tomorrow we start our return trip to New Mexico. We are taking the long way through Canada. We’ll start with the Maritimes and then on to Newfoundland and Labrador. Next will be Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, and a bit of British Columbia before turning south for the Bay Area.

It has been a good stay and I’m feeling a little sad for leaving. While I don’t think I could make this area a permanent home, I understand why some love it. It is quite beautiful with forests that stop at the edge of the sea. The air is clean, and it is quiet. All to my liking. But all this comes with relatively high isolation. There are great neighbors (see below) but everyone is content to spend a lot of time alone or just with their significant other when applicable. That is fine with me too, but once in a while it is nice to go out or see a movie. That entails a longish drive. Perhaps 50 miles. No one place can have everything if for no other reason than some qualities are mutually exclusive.

Mid April sunrise.

Mid April sunrise.

Across the road is Loeber's huge backyard where we often took the dogs.

Across the road is Loeber’s huge backyard where we often took the dogs.

Good dogs near the end of Oak Point Road.

Good dogs near the end of Oak Point Road.

Perhaps it was some sort of karmic parting gift from Mother Nature, but we had a brief snow flurry on Tuesday, April 26, some of which I captured on video.


Goodbye snow flurries.

On Monday we had some neighbors over for beverages, finger food, and great conversation. Our most immediate neighbors are Ray and Myra, both retired chemists. From just up the road were Claire and Walter. Claire is a great walker and strides regularly up and down Oak Point Road. Last but not least was David Ashenden. He is a retired geologist. I mentioned him in an earlier post – One Winter’s Day. It was a nice way to say goodbye and learn a bit more about their lives.

Left to right: Claire, Cathie, David, and Walter

Left to right: Claire, Cathie, David, and Walter

Ray and Myra, our nearest neighbors.

Ray and Myra, our nearest neighbors.

Last week, on our way back from Ellsworth, we stopped in the little town of Hancock, first settled in 1766 and incorporated in 1828. While very early settlements are not unheard of in the west, this side of the country was founded first, and hence, has many more towns of this antiquity. I don’t think that Hancock is special in any particular way, but the reason we stopped was because of a statue of a Union soldier from the Civil War. Having recently been to Gettysburg I was interested in what it was all about.

The statue is located in Hancock’s Memorial Park. It is small, probably not much more than a ¼ acre. Nonetheless, that is enough space to be home to a Civil War Memorial, a World War I memorial, and a third memorial dedicated to those who served in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, and the Persian Gulf.

Many towns have memorials, and perhaps some share what I found compelling about these in Hancock. That compelling factor was how many of the same family names appeared on all three memorials. The number struck me as quite remarkable. From this one small town, for close to 150 years, members from the same family tree have gone off to fight. The memorials are a dedication to those that had served, and I hope that they all came back, however unlikely that probably is.

Civil War Memorial

Civil War Memorial

Two sides of the Civil War Memorial and the WW I plaque.

Two sides of the Civil War Memorial and the WW I plaque.

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